Tag Archives: Scot McKnight

What makes a person a “heretic,” and why should it matter to Baptists?

I often encounter the statement that a person or church is “heretical,” and I am troubled at how loosely the word is used. “Heresy” is a serious technical term, and we need to apply the term carefully and properly. So I welcomed a recent post by Scot McKnight in which he defines the term. The definition of “heresy” Before offering an accurate definition of “heresy,” McKnight identifies two incorrect senses in which the term is … Continue reading

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The serious flaws in the charge that penal substitionary atonement represents divine child abuse

As I jogged this morning, I listened to an interview in which Denny Weaver spoke about the point of his second edition of The Nonviolent Atonement. I understand his desire to take that approach, given his pacifist stance generally, and perhaps I would find the approach more attractive if I were a pacifist too. But the key grounds for my disagreement are that I think all denials that Christ bore the penalty of sin on … Continue reading

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